Recent Changes

Monday, August 30

  1. page home edited ... to the Wiki for RCI's Gay/Straight Founded in January 2010, our mission is to create a m…

    ...
    to the Wiki for RCI's Gay/Straight
    Founded in January 2010, our mission is to create a more accepting environment for gay, lesbian, bi, and trans students at Renfrew Collegiate Institute. For more information about our high school, check info about RCI. For more information on the Gay/Straight Alliance, read our constitution.
    To learn about GSAs in general, have a look at MyGSA.ca's FAQ . We also have a list of useful links and resources for anyone interested.
    (view changes)
    6:28 pm
  2. 6:28 pm
  3. page home edited ... To learn about GSAs in general, have a look at MyGSA.ca's FAQ . We also have a list of useful …
    ...
    To learn about GSAs in general, have a look at MyGSA.ca's FAQ . We also have a list of useful links and resources for anyone interested.
    If you want to print your own posters or flyers, you can download them from this site. Consider joining the I Support Tolerance at RCI Facebook group to show your support for LGBT students.
    (Co-)President(s):President: Hailie Harris
    Vice President:

    Off-campus Advisor:
    Trent Eady
    Other positions: Open to you!

    Staff Advisors: Mr. S. Buffam, Mrs. A. McGregor-Stewart
    If you're a student or community member who would like to help out in any capacity, or if you have any questions, please get in touch via the school or via Facebook.
    (view changes)
    6:27 pm

Thursday, July 15

  1. page Reconsidering Gender edited ... of the world's most widely known gender theorists. thinkers on the subject of gender. Th…
    ...
    of the world's most widely known gender theorists.thinkers on the subject of gender. The following
    " Who is Judith Butler?
    {http://www.theory.org.uk/butler001.jpg} Judith Butler (1956-) is Professor of Comparative Literature and Rhetoric at the University of California, Berkeley, and is well known as a theorist of power, gender, sexuality and identity. Indeed, she is described in alt.culture as "one of the superstars of '90s academia, with a devoted following of grad students nationwide". (A fanzine, Judy!, was published in 1993).
    (view changes)
    12:00 pm
  2. page Reconsidering Gender edited ... {http://www.theory.org.uk/butler001.jpg} Judith Butler (1956-) is Professor of Comparative Lit…
    ...
    {http://www.theory.org.uk/butler001.jpg} Judith Butler (1956-) is Professor of Comparative Literature and Rhetoric at the University of California, Berkeley, and is well known as a theorist of power, gender, sexuality and identity. Indeed, she is described in alt.culture as "one of the superstars of '90s academia, with a devoted following of grad students nationwide". (A fanzine, Judy!, was published in 1993).
    What has she said?
    ...
    most influential bookGenderbook Gender Trouble (1990),
    Butler notes that feminists rejected the idea that biology is destiny, but then developed an account of patriarchal culture which assumed that masculine and feminine genders would inevitably be built, by culture, upon 'male' and 'female' bodies, making the same destiny just as inescapable. That argument allows no room for choice, difference or resistance.
    Butler prefers 'those historical and anthropological positions that understand gender as a relation among socially constituted subjects in specifiable contexts'. In other words, rather than being a fixed attribute in a person, gender should be seen as a fluid variable which shifts and changes in different contexts and at different times.
    (view changes)
    11:59 am
  3. page Reconsidering Gender edited Judith Butler is one of the most widely known gender theorists. The following text is borrowed from…
    Judith Butler is one of the most widely known gender theorists. The following text is borrowed from theory.org.uk :
    "
    Who
    Who is Judith
    {http://www.theory.org.uk/butler001.jpg} Judith Butler (1956-) is Professor of Comparative Literature and Rhetoric at the University of California, Berkeley, and is well known as a theorist of power, gender, sexuality and identity. Indeed, she is described in alt.culture as "one of the superstars of '90s academia, with a devoted following of grad students nationwide". (A fanzine, Judy!, was published in 1993).
    What has she said?
    ...
    This idea of identity as free-floating, as not connected to an 'essence', but instead a performance, is one of the key ideas in queer theory. Seen in this way, our identities, gendered and otherwise, do not express some authentic inner "core" self but are the dramatic effect (rather than the cause) of our performances.
    David Halperin has said, 'Queer is by definition whatever is at odds with the normal, the legitimate, the dominant. There is nothing in particular to which it necessarily refers. It is an identity without an essence.'
    ...
    Gauntlett, 1998.
    "
    "
    [Borrowed from http://www.theory.org.uk/ctr-butl.htm]
    (view changes)
    11:58 am
  4. page Reconsidering Gender edited Judith Butler is one of the most widely known gender theorists. The following text is borrowed fro…
    Judith Butler is one of the most widely known gender theorists. The following text is borrowed from theory.org.uk :
    "
    Who is Judith Butler?
    {http://www.theory.org.uk/butler001.jpg} Judith Butler (1956-) is Professor of Comparative Literature and Rhetoric at the University of California, Berkeley, and is well known as a theorist of power, gender, sexuality and identity. Indeed, she is described in alt.culture as "one of the superstars of '90s academia, with a devoted following of grad students nationwide". (A fanzine, Judy!, was published in 1993).
    What has she said?
    {http://www.theory.org.uk/gentrob2.gif} In her most influential bookGender Trouble (1990), Butler argued that feminism had made a mistake by trying to assert that 'women' were a group with common characteristics and interests. That approach, Butler said, performed 'an unwitting regulation and reification of gender relations' -- reinforcing a binary view of gender relations in which human beings are divided into two clear-cut groups, women and men. Rather than opening up possibilities for a person to form and choose their own individual identity, therefore, feminism had closed the options down.
    Butler notes that feminists rejected the idea that biology is destiny, but then developed an account of patriarchal culture which assumed that masculine and feminine genders would inevitably be built, by culture, upon 'male' and 'female' bodies, making the same destiny just as inescapable. That argument allows no room for choice, difference or resistance.
    Butler prefers 'those historical and anthropological positions that understand gender as a relation among socially constituted subjects in specifiable contexts'. In other words, rather than being a fixed attribute in a person, gender should be seen as a fluid variable which shifts and changes in different contexts and at different times.
    {http://www.theory.org.uk/butler003.jpg}
    The very fact that women and men can say that they feel more or less 'like a woman' or 'like a man' shows, Butler points out, that 'the experience of a gendered... cultural identity is considered an achievement.'
    Butler argues that sex (male, female) is seen to cause gender (masculine, feminine) which is seen to cause desire (towards the other gender). This is seen as a kind of continuum. Butler's approach -- inspired in part by Foucault -- is basically to smash the supposed links between these, so that gender and desire are flexible, free-floating and not 'caused' by other stable factors.
    Butler says: 'There is no gender identity behind the expressions of gender; ... identity is performatively constituted by the very "expressions" that are said to be its results.' (Gender Trouble, p. 25). In other words, gender is a performance; it's what you do at particular times, rather than a universal who you are.
    Butler suggests that certain cultural configurations of gender have seized a hegemonic hold (i.e. they have come to seem natural in our culture as it presently is) -- but, she suggests, it doesn't have to be that way. Rather than proposing some utopian vision, with no idea of how we might get to such a state, Butler calls for subversive action in the present: 'gender trouble' -- the mobilization, subversive confusion, and proliferation of genders -- and therefore identity.
    Butler argues that we all put on a gender performance, whether traditional or not, anyway, and so it is not a question of whether to do a gender performance, but what form that performance will take. By choosing to be different about it, we might work to change gender norms and the binary understanding of masculinity and femininity.
    This idea of identity as free-floating, as not connected to an 'essence', but instead a performance, is one of the key ideas in queer theory. Seen in this way, our identities, gendered and otherwise, do not express some authentic inner "core" self but are the dramatic effect (rather than the cause) of our performances.
    David Halperin has said, 'Queer is by definition whatever is at odds with the normal, the legitimate, the dominant. There is nothing in particular to which it necessarily refers. It is an identity without an essence.'
    This text summarising Gender Trouble is copyright © David Gauntlett, 1998.
    "
    [Borrowed from http://www.theory.org.uk/ctr-butl.htm]

    (view changes)
    11:58 am

More